TED GOES OUT FOR THE EVENING


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Ted leaves to go visit his friend Amber. Ted’s mother Susan says she doesn’t really like Amber. She wishes him a good time anyway.
Ted: See you later, Mom!
Susan: Where are you going, Ted?
Ted: I told Amber I’d drop by.
Susan: What are you two going to do?
Ted: Maybe go to the movies or to a party. Our plans are still up in the air.
Susan: Why don’t you invite her over here?
Ted: I don’t want to hang around here. Dad is really down in the dumps.
Susan: Is Amber the girl with the nose ring and the purple hair?
Ted: Yeah. I’m crazy about her!
Susan: Don’t take this the wrong way, but she’s not exactly my cup of tea.
Ted: Take it easy, Mom. We’re not about to get married. We just enjoy hanging out together.

Susan: I guess there’s no accounting for taste. Have a good time.
Ted: Don’t worry. We’ll have a blast!
Susan: (under her breath) That’s what I’m afraid of!

 

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(to be) crazy about – to like very much
EXAMPLE 1: Amy is so crazy about golf, she’d like to play every day.
EXAMPLE 2: I’m sure Katie will agree to go out on a date with Sam. She’s crazy about him!

cup of tea – the type of person or thing that one generally likes
EXAMPLE 1: Hockey isn’t Alan’s cup of tea. He prefers soccer.
EXAMPLE 2: I know Joy is nice, but she’s simply not my cup of tea.
NOTE: This expression is almost always used in the negative. She’s not my cup of tea.

(to be) down in the dumps – to feel sad; to be depressed
EXAMPLE 1: It’s not surprising that Lisa is down in the dumps. Paws, the cat she had for 20 years, just died.
EXAMPLE 2: It’s easy to feel down in the dumps when it’s raining outside.

(to) drop by – to pay a short, often unannounced visit
EXAMPLE 1: If we have time before the movie, let’s drop by Bill’s house.
EXAMPLE 2: “Hi, I was in the neighborhood so I thought I’d drop by!”

(to) hang around – to spend time idly; to linger
EXAMPLE 1: We had to hang around the airport for an extra six hours because our flight was delayed.
EXAMPLE 2: Nina’s boyfriend Boris is coming over soon. She hopes her parents aren’t planning on hanging around the house.

(to) hang out – to spend time (often doing nothing)
EXAMPLE 1: Ted spent all of last summer hanging out by his friend’s pool.
EXAMPLE 2: Kathy and her friends like to hang out at the mall.
NOTE: “Hang out with” means to keep company with someone.

(to) have a blast [slang] – to enjoy oneself very much
EXAMPLE 1: Last summer, Nicole had a blast backpacking through Europe with some friends.
EXAMPLE 2: Heather spent her spring break in Fort Lauderdale with millions of other college students. She had a blast!

(to) have a good time – to enjoy oneself
EXAMPLE 1: Marcy and Jose had a good time salsa dancing at Babalu, a nightclub in Manhattan.
EXAMPLE 2: Nora and Jake had a good time on their honeymoon in Maui.

take it easy – relax; don’t worry
EXAMPLE 1: You lost your keys? Take it easy, I’m sure you’ll find them.
EXAMPLE 2: Stop yelling and take it easy. I’m sure there’s a good explanation for why Joe borrowed your car without asking first.

(to) take something the wrong way – to take offense
EXAMPLE 1: Don’t take this the wrong way, but I liked your hair better before you got it cut.
EXAMPLE 2: Jessica is offended. I guess she took it the wrong way when I told her she should exercise more.
NOTE: This expression is often used in the negative form: “Don’t take this
the wrong way, but…”

there’s no accounting for taste – it’s impossible to explain individual likes and dislikes
EXAMPLE 1: Ted likes to put sugar on his spaghetti. I guess there’s no accounting for taste.
EXAMPLE 2: Tiffany has a tattoo of a squirrel on her leg. There’s no accounting for taste.

under one’s breath – quietly; in a whisper
EXAMPLE 1: “Amber is strange,” muttered Nicole under her breath, as Ted was leaving the room.
EXAMPLE 2: Mike agreed to take out the garbage, saying under his breath, “I always do the dirty work around here.”

(to be) up in the air – not yet determined; uncertain
EXAMPLE 1: It might rain later, so our plans for the picnic are up in the air.
EXAMPLE 2: Our trip to Russia is up in the air. We aren’t sure we’ll get our visas in time.